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Jul 22

Egypt in the Bible

By Admin | Jeremiah , Joseph

Egypt:

The Bible names many different countries: Israel, Babylon, India, Ethiopia, Persia, Syria, Moab, Egypt, Italy, and many more.  The most common one is Israel – not surprisingly, since God says that for him it is the centre of the world, the land he promised to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (whom he renamed “Israel”).[1] Continue reading

Notes

Notes
1 Sometimes it is hard to separate God’s love for the land from his love for the people he chose to give it to: see Ezekiel 5:5; 20:6; 38:12; Isaiah 41:8-9; Zechariah 2:8 and Jeremiah 12:14.  When you think about it, it makes sense that God would give his favourite land to his best friends!
Jun 21

Jeremiah in Egypt: Tahpanhes

By Admin | Jeremiah

Jeremiah in Egypt (Tahpanhes):

After Nebuchadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem, he appointed Gedaliah governor of Judah and left some soldiers to provide support for the new administration.  However, evil men assassinated Gedaliah and killed the soldiers.  Afraid, the people who lived in Judah decided to escape to Egypt to avoid any retribution from Nebuchadnezzar.  First they went to Tahpanhes (Jeremiah chapters 43-44), which was the closest major city of Egypt to Judah.

According to Wikipedia, it was later known as Daphnae and is now called Tell Defenneh.  At that time, it was located beside a lake on a branch of the Nile delta.  The site is now situated on the Suez Canal.  The meaning of the name “Tahpanhes” is uncertain. Continue reading

Apr 17

Timeline of Jehoshaphat’s life

By Admin | Jehoshaphat , Timelines

Timeline of Jehoshaphat's life:

For those who don’t know, Jehoshaphat was the fourth king of Judah after the kingdom of Israel split in two – Israel and Judah – following the death of King Solomon.  Jehoshaphat was a righteous and faithful king who would be high on the list of the best kings of Judah – although he had a problem with being too tolerant of evil people. Here, we provide a timeline of Jehoshaphat’s life. Continue reading

Mar 16

The birth of Jacob’s sons

By Admin | Joseph , Timelines

Birth of Jacob's sons:

Some people have no children at all, while others have many children. However many we have, though, we are used to the fact that it normally takes about 9 months of pregnancy for each child. So what happened with the birth of Jacob’s sons?

At first glance, we could think that this 9 month limit wasn’t true in the family of Jacob, the son of Isaac! However, his was no ordinary family, thanks to the trickery of Laban, his father-in-law.  This post looks at Jacob’s speedy transformation from having neither wife nor child to having 4 wives and 11 sons. Continue reading

Jan 09

Destroying Solomon’s Temple

By Admin | Jeremiah

Destroying Solomon's temple:

Destroying Solomon’s Temple

Why is destroying things so much more fun than building them?

We can dimly appreciate the time and effort taken to build a tall brick chimney, yet when such an amazing edifice has outlived its usefulness and plans are made to demolish it, large crowds will often gather to watch the demolition.  No-one sat watching the hard work and long weeks of building as the chimney grew one round of bricks at a time, yet many will come to revel in the sudden destruction as a carefully placed explosive charge brings a multitude of bricks crashing down.

Breaking down is always easier than building up – but that doesn’t mean it is always easy. Continue reading

Dec 04

Jeremiah in Egypt

By Admin | Jeremiah

Jeremiah in Egypt (Tahpanhes):

Jeremiah in Egypt

Background

Nebuchadnezzar conquered the nation of Judah and destroyed Jerusalem and the temple in 587/586BC.  He captured King Zedekiah and killed his sons, then blinded him and took him away to Babylon, where he died in captivity. Continue reading

Nov 05

King David’s Family Tree

By Admin | David , Family trees

King David's family tree:

King David’s Family Tree

If you look far enough up King David’s family tree (ten generations), you will see that he came from the tribe of Judah.  And as we look through his family tree, we see that some of his relatives are still very well known, even 3,000 years later.  Some of his famous relatives include: Continue reading

Oct 19

Moving the Ark of the Covenant

By Admin | David , Miscellaneous

Moving the Ark of the Covenant:

The Ark of the Covenant was a gold-plated wooden box that God told Moses to make in the wilderness. Its lid was made of solid gold with two cherubim facing each other on top.  Inside the box were two tables of stone with God’s law written on them.  The ark was to represent the presence of God and be a place where God met with his people. Most of the time, it was to be kept in the innermost room of the tabernacle – the most holy of the articles of worship, and there were special rules about how it was to be treated.  These included just how careful the people of Israel were to be when moving the Ark of the Covenant. Continue reading

Oct 13

Obed-edom the Gittite

By Admin | David , Miscellaneous

Obededom the Gittite:

King David wanted the Ark of the Covenant of God near him, so he arranged for it to be brought into Jerusalem on a cart as part of a huge celebration. However, the oxen pulling the cart stumbled and the ark wobbled. Tragically, a man called Uzzah who was driving the cart put out his hand to steady it and was struck dead by God.

The celebration was cancelled and the ark was moved into the nearby house of a man called Obed-edom. This event is the subject of a micro-tale found in Fiction Favours the Fact – Book 3.

Since I wrote that story, several people have asked me questions about this man, Obed-edom.

These questions have revolved around who Obed-edom was, his nationality and possible genealogy. The reasoning behind the questions seems to be that David would not be likely to put the Ark of the Covenant in the care of a man who was not even an Israelite. As an intriguing follow-up to this idea, a search of the Bible shows that the name Obed-edom is not unique, but we’ll get to that later. Continue reading

Sep 20

Zelophehad’s daughters

By Admin | Miscellaneous

Zelophehad's daughters:

When the nation of Israel escaped from Egypt and travelled around in the wilderness for 40 years, Zelophehad’s daughters became some of the most famous women in the nation.

We know nothing much about Zelophehad, except that he had five daughters and no sons. Why was this important? Well, in Israel, a man left his land and goods to his sons. When a woman married, she joined the tribe of the man she married.  Any children born to the couple also belonged to that tribe. Even foreign women could join the tribes of Israel in this way. Two examples: Rahab from Jericho and Ruth the Moabitess both married men from the tribe of Judah and thus joined the tribe of Judah.

Of course, most women married local men belonging to the same tribe so they didn’t transferred to another tribe. However, they were free to do so if they chose – in most cases. Continue reading

Aug 22

David’s legacy

By Admin | David , Miscellaneous

David's Legacy:

Yesterday morning our family read 1 Kings 1, a chapter that tells about the end of the reign of David, the great king of Israel.  At the age of 70, David was a sad shell of the mighty man that he had been.  He was reduced to needing a nurse to lie in bed with him to keep him warm, and his control of the kingdom of Israel was slipping away. Yet David’s effect on the kingdom was to continue for many generations after his death. So what was David’s legacy and what can we learn from it?Continue reading